Drive, Ego, Object, and Self: A Synthesis for Clinical Work

Drive, Ego, Object, and Self: A Synthesis for Clinical Work

Drive, Ego, Object, and Self: A Synthesis for Clinical Work

Drive, Ego, Object, and Self: A Synthesis for Clinical Work

Synopsis

In this important new book, the noted theoretician Fred Pine provides a synthesis of the four conceptual domains of psychoanalysis: drives, ego functioning, object relations, and self experience. He argues that a focus on the clinical phenomena themselves, and not on the theoretical edifices built around them, readily illuminates the inevitable integration of the several sets of phenomena in each person's unique psychological organization. With superb clarity, Pine shows how one or another or more of these becomes central to a particular individual's psychopathology. Drawing on a wealth of detailed clinical material- brief vignettes, process notes of sessions, and full analyses- he vividly demonstrates how a broad multimodel perspective enhances the treatment process, and is, in fact, its natural form. He also applies these ideas to such crucial clinical issues as preoedipal pathology and ego defect, the so-called symbiotic phase, and the mutative factors in treatment. Conceptually elegant and immensely practical, this highly original work is certain to be, in the words of Arnold Cooper, "a guide for theorists and clinicians for many years to come."

Excerpt

The phenomena of clinical work, as they are conceptualized today, are often seen as falling into four broad domains. We are accustomed to referring to these domains as those of drive, ego, object relations, and self. Our theories ought to fit with these observations and to suggest how things got that way. My aim in this book is to propose a view along those lines.

Whatever original contribution there is herein, it is not intended to be in the groupings of the phenomena themselves, nor in the broad conceptual languages used to describe them. There I shall simply work with our familiar terms: drive, ego, object relations, self. I recognize that these are loose and overlapping groupings, and that the phenomena could be grouped in other ways; but they are familiar, and I am used to rediscovering them continually in clinical work, and so I shall stay with them here. I wish to emphasize at the outset that I will be focusing on the phenomena, not formal theories regarding them--thus self, but not Self Psychology; object relations, but not the views of any one theorist; and drive and ego, but not only in the ways they have been addressed in classical psychoanalysis.

As phenomena, they have been part of the data of observation ever since . . .

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