The Hundred Years War for Morocco: Gunpowder and the Military Revolution in the Early Modern Muslim World

The Hundred Years War for Morocco: Gunpowder and the Military Revolution in the Early Modern Muslim World

The Hundred Years War for Morocco: Gunpowder and the Military Revolution in the Early Modern Muslim World

The Hundred Years War for Morocco: Gunpowder and the Military Revolution in the Early Modern Muslim World

Synopsis

"The Hundred Years War for Morocco reinterprets early modern Moroccan history, focusing on evolving modes of warfare as the decisive force that structured and propelled revolutionary change in sixteenth-century Morocco. Enfeebled by revolts, invasions, and civil war, Moroccan society at first lay open to conquest by European and Ottoman armies wielding gunpowder weapons. Cook describes how Morocco overcame its tormentors through its own military revolution, a process that energized other domestic political, social, and religious transformations to produce a unified, independent Moroccan state. By centering his analysis on warfare and state-building, Cook's work departs from studies of the subject by other historians and offers important comparative insights on the "Military Revolution" thesis." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

The "Hundred Years War for Morocco" gives a name to what happened when the military revolution created by early modern gunpowder warfare merged into equally revolutionary political, social, and ideological currents coursing through one nation. Characterization of a century of Moroccan history as a "hundred years war" is no idle eurocentrism. It purposely invokes images of the protracted strife that afflicted late medieval France to stress a basic reality, that war drove change in Morocco more than any other human activity from the implosion of the Banū Marīn state in the 1460s to the final triumph of the Sa adian dynasty in the late sixteenth century.

A study focused on war and its meaning for early modern Morocco seems about due. No historian of Africa and the Middle East has yet attempted an extended analysis of the era centered on armies and war-making. Even though the Moroccan case speaks positively to their flagship Military Revolution paradigm, the scholars of the "new" military history have shown little interest in Morocco's Hundred Years War. This book, then, combines insights from Roberts, Parker, and other military historians with the records of the time to reinterpret a vibrant, violent, and fertile phase of Moroccan history. Its focus is the evolution of armies and states in a past society undergoing change shaped and propelled by prolonged war. Additionally, as a study of the process that is war, of the interplay between armed forces and society, of state-building (and state-wrecking), it seeks to nudge the so-called new military history into directions outside Europe.

The Hundred Years War for Morocco erupted in the mid-fifteenth century from a corrosive mix of foreign invasion by Iberian crusaders, a dynastic civil war between the ruling houses of Banu+̄ Mari+̄n and Banu+̄ Wat+̣t+̣a+̄s, and revolts by towns and tribes everywhere in secession. Empowered by their overwhelming advantage in gunpowder artillery . . .

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