The Other Price of Hitler's War: German Military and Civilian Losses Resulting from World War II

The Other Price of Hitler's War: German Military and Civilian Losses Resulting from World War II

The Other Price of Hitler's War: German Military and Civilian Losses Resulting from World War II

The Other Price of Hitler's War: German Military and Civilian Losses Resulting from World War II

Synopsis

"In this important book, the German-born author has detailed German deaths in WW II, civilian and military, because he feels there is an inadequate knowledge in the English-speaking world of Germany's losses. His compilation includes those lost in the regular ground forces, the navy, the air force, the special forces; deaths inflicted by partisans; prisoner-of-war deaths; losses among the civilian population; and those who died resisting Hitler. Final chapters cover the deaths of German women raped by Soviet troops; deaths of Germans who fled westward escaping Russian armies; those expelled from East German territories; and those executed after war crimes trials. Sorge's book is a massive, somber summation of the price Germans paid for fighting Hitler's war... this book ought to be in every collection on the history of WW II." - Choice

Excerpt

Since the founding of the Federal Republic of Germany in 1949, German- American relations have, on the surface, been perceived as generally positive. They constitute one of the main elements of the North Atlantic community's defense strategy for Western Europe. However, the apparent goodwill between the two countries may have clouded the fact that from the beginning, West Germany's political leaders, from Christian Democrat Konrad Adenauer to Social Democrat Helmut Schmidt, have had real differences on a number of issues with their partners in Washington. Occasionally, unilateral foreign policy changes by a U.S. president have placed the German leaders in a difficult position in Bonn, where bilateral consultations would have been very much preferred.

In recent years, these transatlantic bonds have been subjected to additional strains over the issue of upgrading American missiles on West German soil and Washington's desire to involve the Federal Republic and other nato (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) partners in the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). There also exists in West Germany a lingering awareness that, in spite of that country's overall commitment to remain America's strong ally, a one-sided or at least incomplete image of Germany's past is still being nurtured by many Americans nearly four decades after World War ii. This was especially evident from the furor surrounding President Reagan's conciliatory gesture during his recent visit to the German military cemetery in Bitburg, West Germany. Many Germans feel that little is known or much has been forgotten on this side of the Atlantic of the price the German people themselves paid for their twelve years with Hitler.

The purpose of this book is to present, though in an admittedly brief form, an overview of the losses suffered by the Germans in both the military and civilian sectors during and as a result of World War ii, through enemy action, as well as at the hands of their own regime.

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