Supportive Supervision in Schools

Supportive Supervision in Schools

Supportive Supervision in Schools

Supportive Supervision in Schools

Synopsis

Does fear or trust dominate relationships in your school's classrooms? How well do supervisors listen to and respond to teachers? How well do teachers listen to and respond to students? How are problems identified and solved? Supportive Supervision in Schools is a guide for teachers and administrators who want to create good school climates and a school culture that encourages professional growth and development among staff members. It uses a conferencing method to allow teachers, administrators, and students to discuss and reflect upon what they are doing inside the school building. The authors use actual examples to illustrate how supportive environments can be constructed.

Excerpt

Supportive supervision is a learning situation for both teachers and their supervisors. It often means unlearning old ideas and learning new ways of thinking and doing things. Supervisors have to learn to trust the eyes and ears of teachers, while teachers have to trust that supervisors will use the information gathered to help teachers help themselves. The results will often be seen in more friendly, collegial relations between supervisors and teachers and a better understanding of classroom behavior.

Supervision is thus a method of teaching staff to act in more conscious ways. Its goal is to provide teachers and supervisors with more information and deeper insights into what is happening around them. This increases the options teachers have as they work with students. If the partnership between supervisors and teachers works, teachers learn to identify and resolve their problems, while supervisors get a better idea about what is happening in different classrooms. This provides supervisors with more opportunities to think about their actions and emotions and to adopt conscious plans to improve the learning situation.

Every conference can be seen as an opportunity to provide teachers with the ego support they need. With this support, teachers can talk to children about what is happening in their classrooms. This will help teachers to act more consciously. Action is important; without it supervisors and teachers will not be able to achieve desired outcomes. However, testimonials to the conference process must be taken with a grain of salt unless the process results in more effective teaching and learning by supervisors, teachers, and students. If a supervisor and teacher work well together in conferences, some evidence of improved relations between them, and between teachers and students, should be apparent to observers. For instance, the fears of teachers, or the suspiciousness between them and supervisors, may diminish considerably; teachers may have more self-

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