Voices in Architectural Education: Cultural Politics and Pedagogy

Voices in Architectural Education: Cultural Politics and Pedagogy

Voices in Architectural Education: Cultural Politics and Pedagogy

Voices in Architectural Education: Cultural Politics and Pedagogy

Synopsis

This book is a unique collection of new and existing articles about progressive architectural teaching and learning. Dialectically linking architectural education and society, it presents authors who conceptualize architectural pedagogy within a critical analysis of the larger society. The authors comprise a multiplicity of voices, including women, people of color, and students; voices often marginalized but crucial to a remapping of the cultural-political terrain in their struggle to make issues of gender, race, and class central to a reconceptualization of architectural education and pedagogy.

Excerpt

Technology can be used to subjugate the people or it can be used to liberate them. . . . And whoever says that a technician of whatever sort, be he [sic] an architect, doctor, engineer, scientist, etc., needs solely to work with his instruments, in his chosen specialty, while his countrymen are starving or wearing themselves out in the struggle, has de facto gone over to the other side. He is not apolitical: he has taken a political decision, but one opposed to the movements for liberation.

Che Guevara spoke these words before the International Union of Architects (UIA) Congress in 1963. When I first read them ten years later, I was mesmerized, shocked, and angered all at once. Guevara's words were so simple, straightforward, yet extraordinary. They still have power.

I began teaching in 1977, and I have returned to these words time and again. I look for new wrinkles, trying to unravel new layers of meaning. I often fiddle with the words so as to achieve new understanding by substituting certain words with others. "Technology" is one word I have changed frequently, replacing it with such terms as architectural practice, architectural media, modernism, and postmodernism. More recently, as I spend more time teaching architecture than practicing it, I have introduced words like education, schooling, curriculum, and pedagogy. The insight gained from this latter process of substitution is what has led to this book: to bring together a collection of voices who struggle to conceive and practice architectural education in liberatory ways.

Voices in Architectural Education challenges architectural educators to . . .

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