Financing Information Services: Problems, Changing Approaches, and New Opportunities for Academic and Research Libraries

Financing Information Services: Problems, Changing Approaches, and New Opportunities for Academic and Research Libraries

Financing Information Services: Problems, Changing Approaches, and New Opportunities for Academic and Research Libraries

Financing Information Services: Problems, Changing Approaches, and New Opportunities for Academic and Research Libraries

Synopsis

Will American academic and research libraries be able to cope with the current technological, economic, and organizational issues that are bringing about rapid changes in information services or must fundamental changes first take place within these libraries? The twelve essays collected by Spyers-Duran and Mann attempt to answer this question. Section I: Problems, contains essays on the precarious financial environment of today's academic institutions; the erosion of funding levels in British university libraries; and realistic suggestions for financial planning in academic libraries. Section II: Changing Approaches, offers discussions on the importance of sharing scholarly resources; the discrepancy between library budgets and services offered; the growing role of the library in the information industry; a review of funding formulas in the academic library; and the changing needs, sources, and styles of financial planning. The final section of the book explores new opportunities for academic and research libraries, and includes information on current library automation; information-sharing among member libraries; external contracting for library services; and grantsmanship.

Excerpt

The essays printed in this volume were first presented at an international conference entitled "Contemporary Issues in Academic and Research Libraries," held at Boulder, Colorado, on February 28, 29 and March 1, 1984. The distinguished speakers and registrants represented a wide range of expertise including librarians, presidents, academic administrators, computer experts, and business executives from England, Canada, Australia, and the United States.

The conference papers raised many issues and questions stimulating and challenging the profession to seek new responses and new solutions to persistent and nagging issues in academic and research librarianship. The issues raised by the contributors can best be summarized by these two basic questions: Can academic and research libraries cope with the current technological, economic, and organizational issues that are bringing about rapid changes in information technology and information services? Will libraries require fundamental changes in order to remain operationally effective and economically viable? The full answer to these and other questions raised was not the purpose of the conference.

However, the reader will undoubtedly benefit from the wealth of information, advice, and experience shared by the distinguished contributors through these papers.

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