Labor Relations in Argentina, Brazil, and Chile

Labor Relations in Argentina, Brazil, and Chile

Labor Relations in Argentina, Brazil, and Chile

Labor Relations in Argentina, Brazil, and Chile

Excerpt

For more than a dozen years I have spent much of my time traveling around Latin America, collecting material on, among other things, labor relations in that part of the world. In 1946 and 1947 I spent six months in Chile, working on my Ph.D. thesis on the subject of labor-management relations there. At that time I visited virtually every important industrial and mining enterprise in the republic and talked to most of the leading trade unionists and many government officials. In the present volume I have borrowed heavily from the materials which I collected at that time and which were used in the thesis presented at Columbia University in 1950.

When, in 1955, Dr. John Dunlop of Harvard University suggested the possibility of making a survey of labor relations in the ABC countries of South America, as part of the broader Inter-University Project on Labor Relations in Economic Development, I was very pleased indeed. My wife and I spent seven and a half months in Latin America, principally in the three countries discussed in the present book. Most of the material on Brazil and Argentina was collected during that trip. In Chile I confined myself largely to bringing up to date the information which I had gathered almost a decade before, and visiting certain enterprises and institutions which had not been in existence when I was first there.

The three countries that are discussed in this book are among the most important and interesting nations of Latin America. Throughout most of the nineteenth century they were the leading powers of the South American continent, economically the richest and politically and militarily the most powerful. During the present century they have continued to be leaders. Brazil has grown into the most populous and rapidly industrializing country of the region; Argentina has the highest general standard of living in Latin America; Chile has been a pioneer in social legislation and education.

Labor relations in these three countries have developed differently in each case, as will become clear in the pages which follow. None of them is . . .

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