Public Administration in the Global Village

Public Administration in the Global Village

Public Administration in the Global Village

Public Administration in the Global Village

Synopsis

Public Administration in the Global Village offers a global and comparative approach to the study of public administration. It examines the ongoing international changes in the field of public administration; it defines the emerging new world order and the promises and challenges that it holds for public administration; and it stipulates the effects and side effects of these changes on developing countries. The volume seeks to promote a global and comparative perspective on public administration to counter the continuing parochialism and ethnocentrism in the field.

Excerpt

The emergence of a globally connected and interdependent world is beyond dispute. the fact that public administration as a discipline and public administrators as individual actors are parts of this global system is also beyond debate. What is needed, then, is the reflection and integration of this cognizance in the theory and practice of public administration. the call for integration is in fact a call for the rediscovery of comparative public administration on one hand and the reassertion of the international component of public administration on the other hand. Both dimensions--comparative and international--are the two sides of the same coin, for any effort to compare is irrelevant if we assume ourselves (Americans) to be uniquely different (whether superior or not) from other systems; similarly, any discussion on the global aspect of public administration is extraneous if we fail to accept the utility of learning from others' experiences. the literature in public administration assumes the relevance of global forces in individual areas (in the context of fiscal austerity and extended world markets); nevertheless, there is a definite dearth of paradigms that allow our thinking to become truly "global and comparative."

The chapters in this book, individually and collectively, stress the need for a new approach in public administration. the newness of this approach depends on the identification of what is lacking in the existing approach. Similarly, the relevance and credibility of this approach depend on the identification of the changes that have taken place since the acceptance of the existing approach.

Fred W. Riggs's chapter warns us of the blinding effects of the prevailing superficial distinction between politics and public administration. While the definitions offered in public administration textbooks willingly embrace the . . .

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