Curricular Landscapes, Democratic Vistas: Transformative Leadership in Higher Education

Curricular Landscapes, Democratic Vistas: Transformative Leadership in Higher Education

Curricular Landscapes, Democratic Vistas: Transformative Leadership in Higher Education

Curricular Landscapes, Democratic Vistas: Transformative Leadership in Higher Education

Synopsis

This book offers a different way of thinking about post-secondary curriculum by considering how institutional curricula can act as a critical agent for preparing students to participate in the democratic public sphere. Tierney demonstrates that the curriculum itself is a cultural product that institutions of higher education socially construct and that the manner in which the individual institution defines its curriculum commits it to certain philosophical and ideological choices. The result of a year's research that included over 250 interviews at seven colleges in universities throughout the U.S., the volume concludes with recommendations administrators and faculty may employ in the effort to advance democracy in their colleges and universities.

Excerpt

Without the encouragement of colleagues and friends at the Center for the Study of Higher Education at Penn State University this book would have been impossible. Sally Kelley arranged the site visits, typed and proofread this manuscript and, along with Marilyn Downing and Beverly Ladrido, helped create a positive working environment at the Center. My research assistant, Beth Jones, helped compile the bibliography and ensure the accuracy of the text. Kay Moore, then Director of the Center for the Study of Higher Education at Penn State, and now at Michigan State, was instrumental in the completion of this book. Kay provided criticism and feedback on earlier drafts that helped me reformulate my ideas. Penn State's loss is Michigan State's gain. Finally, the generous support of Ralph Lundgren and the Lilly Endowment provided me with the funding to conduct the research that has resulted in this book. Needless to say, the ideas in this work reflect my own notions about the curriculum.

I have also been fortunate in the sites for these case studies, the individuals interviewed and, most especially, the institutional liaisons who agreed to help arrange my visits during the academic year 1987- 88. in virtually all instances hardworking individuals--administrators, faculty, staff, students, and parent--donated their time to provide the data that make up this book.

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