Strategic Planning and Multinational Trading Blocs

Strategic Planning and Multinational Trading Blocs

Strategic Planning and Multinational Trading Blocs

Strategic Planning and Multinational Trading Blocs

Synopsis

Cross-border investments and cooperative business ventures are driving the global economy on an unprecedented scale. Business professionals and policy makers must be aware of the potential of trading blocs as a competitive weapon. Delener examines the rationale for international trading blocs and free trade with a focus on the implications for strategic planning of firms and national industry sectors. He looks at the development and conditions of the major existing regional trading blocs and discusses the crucial issues that will impact those who do business within them. The book provides professionals, researchers, and students a firm grasp of the issues of central importance to strategic planning in global corporations and multinational trading blocs.

Excerpt

The rapid spread of multinational trading blocs is surely the most important recent development in the global trade system. Almost all empirical studies of European and North American arrangements find positive impacts on members' living standards and inconsequential impacts on non- members' living standards. There is a mainstream explanation of the causes of recent trading blocs. It rests on two pillars: (1) frustration with the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and (2) the United States's conversion from devoted multilateralist to ardent regionalist. If this explanation is right, multinational trading blocs is indeed the strong medicine called for.

The coming years promise to be the era of the Trade Pact Wars. Canada's recently announced trade talks with Chile, Germany's push for closer Trans-Atlantic ties with the United States, and ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) efforts to promote intraregional trade all put the fledgling World Trade Organization (WTO) behind the 8-ball as it tries to put teeth into its role as the watchdog of global trade. Multinational trade agreements increasingly reflect the shift in the focus of trade liberalization away from tariffs and other measures at the border toward domestic policy issues including competition policy and investment rules. As multinational enterprises (MNEs) seek to site production close to local . . .

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