Making the Newsmakers: International Handbook on Journalism Training

Making the Newsmakers: International Handbook on Journalism Training

Making the Newsmakers: International Handbook on Journalism Training

Making the Newsmakers: International Handbook on Journalism Training

Synopsis

This study of journalism training analyzes training programs in 70 countries and lists 700 training institutions around the world. This first worldwide survey of communication training since 1958 was sponsored by UNESCO. In analyzing different programs, the study examines such areas as the type of institution in which training is given, the kinds of courses offered, entrance requirements, the number of students, qualifications of educators, diplomas or degrees awarded and the placement of graduates. It also explores different press concepts and, in particular, it notes the massive changes that have taken place in Eastern and Central Europe.

Excerpt

This book has grown out of a previous book of mine, Choosing the News, a comparative study of factors influencing the way in which journalists select and process information in different countries. One of the most influential factors is training. Not all press systems are the same, and journalism training varies considerably from one system to another. As the reflection of journalism, training is shaped by the social, cultural, economic and political conditions in which it is conducted. It is affected by press laws, government controls, ownership, competition and, above all, the perceived function of journalism in any given society.

As a study of training needs, programs and facilities in 70 countries, Making the Newsmakers is the first worldwide survey of its kind since 1958. As an up-to-date directory of almost 600 training establishments in every region of the world, it is also a work of reference. Collecting, processing and analyzing the data needed for this study has been a tremendous task that would have been impossible without the generous cooperation and able assistance of a large number of people and institutions.

First and foremost, I want to thank UNESCO for sponsoring the research required to complete the study. In particular, I wish to acknowledge the friendly assistance and enlightened advice of Morten Giersing, Chief of UNESCO's Section of Free Flow of Information and Communication Research, and Alan Hancock, Director of the Division of Communication.

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