Environmental Policies in the Third World: A Comparative Analysis

Environmental Policies in the Third World: A Comparative Analysis

Environmental Policies in the Third World: A Comparative Analysis

Environmental Policies in the Third World: A Comparative Analysis

Synopsis

This book analyzes environmental problems and policies in developing countries around the world and discusses new prospects for international cooperation and funding. It considers hard political choices, who is to blame for environmental decay, who should pay to overcome problems, and how they should be handled. Experts from different countries offer their perspectives about the role of multilateral agencies, the North-South dimensions of environmental problems from 1972 to present, and the experiences in India, China, Indonesia, Africa, Nigeria, Chile, and Mexico. A bibliography enhances this authoritative study for the use of political scientists, economists, and public administrators, for teachers, students, and professionals.

Excerpt

It is not easy to generalize about the nature of politics and political institutions in so vast and variegated an arena as the Third World. The countries in this area differ from one another in their levels of social evolution, political and economic development, technological change, and issues and problems related to environment. Common among these countries, however, are (1) low economic development, (2) the need to improve the quality of life of millions of impoverished people, and (3) environmental degradation. No discussion of sustainable economic development is complete without considering the interrelatedness of these three. They interact and impact each other and are attracting increasing attention and concern among policymakers locally, nationally, and internationally.

The rise of concern and consciousness about environmental issues in the Third World countries can be understood only in the broader context of international movement in general and the domestic impulses that drive policy formulations related to economic development in particular. These countries are faced with meeting the twin goals of economic and environmental development. They do not have the luxury to choose one over the other. The policy choices to accomplish both are not easy. Environmental decay resulting from population explosion, urban degradation, tropical deforestation, ozone depletion, and hazardous waste disposal is real, but so is the need for sustaining basic needs of day-to-day life. Their dilemma and frustration is oftentimes expressed in their policy stands taken at various international forums. Hence, there is a North-South dimension to the . . .

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