The Conservative Press in Twentieth-Century America

The Conservative Press in Twentieth-Century America

The Conservative Press in Twentieth-Century America

The Conservative Press in Twentieth-Century America

Synopsis

Including representative journals for the 20th and late 19th centuries, this book profiles the most significant conservative journals of the past century. From the rise of industrial capitalism, when laissez-faire conservatives praised bountiful America, to the end of the Cold War, these journals have covered a variety of topics from differing, sometimes even contradictory, points of view. Yet they speak to the richness and comprehensiveness of the conservative press in America. Together they provide a focused history of conservative thought in 20th Century America.

Excerpt

The sixty-five journals examined in this book are a representative sample of conservative periodicals published in the United States during the twentieth century, with several beginning earlier amid the rise of industrial capitalism when laissezfaire conservatives sang hymns to bountiful America. Addressing a wide variety of topics from conservative points of view, the journals provide a focused survey of the history of American conservative thought from the late nineteenth century to the end of the cold war. Testifying to the persistent vigor and importance of conservatism during the twentieth century, they make clear that the implications to be derived from fundamental principles common to conservatism have been varied and even contradictory. While this goes far to account for the comprehensiveness and richness of the conservative periodical press in America, in a work of this sort it poses difficult problems of precise definition and requires judgmental determinations of what to include and how to organize what is included.

Leaving aside for now the question of definition, which we address in the Introduction, the most painful of the editorial problems was to determine which journals to include. On occasion, difficulty in securing a contributor well-informed about a particular journal's tradition proved decisive. On others, journals such as National Interest and Inquiry, for example, were omitted for reasons of space, not substance. Finally, having elected to address what have been for the most part responsible conservative publications, we determined, as a general rule, to include monthlies and quarterlies and to exclude both weeklies and the daily press. Usually we were able to do this, although in practice we were not willing to exclude all weekly publications. Partly this was because of the fluctuating periodicity of some journals. the Gospel Advocate, for example, began as a monthly; then, for over a hundred years, it was a weekly; it became a semimonthly in 1978, but ten years later, in 1988, it was made a monthly again. Journals that began as weeklies or biweeklies sometimes became monthlies, as with Christian Economics. It was . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.