Chinese Subculture and Criminality: Non-Traditional Crime Groups in America

Chinese Subculture and Criminality: Non-Traditional Crime Groups in America

Chinese Subculture and Criminality: Non-Traditional Crime Groups in America

Chinese Subculture and Criminality: Non-Traditional Crime Groups in America

Synopsis

By the 1990s, Asian crime groups will become the United States' foremost organized crime problem. Ko-lin Chin warns that limited law enforcement resources will be ineffective without a precise understanding of the norms, values, structure, criminal patterns, and interrelationships of these groups. Taking a major step toward this effort Chin's volume is a sociological investigation of Triads, tongs, and street gangs. It explores the where, how, and why of these groups and examines the connection between Triad subculture and criminality.

Excerpt

When a young Chinese scholar came to me for advice on his living among his countrymen in Chinatown, New York, to become nearly a participant observer among Chinese gangs to study their deviant and criminal activities, I was very apprehensive. I feared for his life, for I had heard of a graduate student in San Francisco who lost his life trying to study the same phenomena there. But Ko-lin Chin was persistent and finally convinced me that he would be assured safety.

His prodigious labors have resulted in one of the most exciting studies that I have been privy to from the outset. This study is a marvelous combination of the best qualitative observations with careful historical analysis that I have seen in many years. We learn not only about the historical Tongs of generations and their geographic expansions, but also of their infiltration into current criminal gang activities across the United States and Canada.

The efforts of the President's Commission on Organized Crime in the United States only touched the surface of Chinese involvement compared to Ko-lin Chin's probing analysis. This study is empirically rich and theoretically sound both in historical and sociological terms.

Marvin E. Wolfgang . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.