Roosevelt and Romanism: Catholics and American Diplomacy, 1937-1945

Roosevelt and Romanism: Catholics and American Diplomacy, 1937-1945

Roosevelt and Romanism: Catholics and American Diplomacy, 1937-1945

Roosevelt and Romanism: Catholics and American Diplomacy, 1937-1945

Synopsis

"Balanced research, clear narration, and fair-minded handling of a delicate subject have gone into this compact, yet broad analysis. From the standpoint of President Roosevelt's political survival and that of his country, the winning over of American Catholics to an interventionist foreign policy was a stark necessity since Catholics were mainly Democrats and isolationist in the 1930s.... Flynn trods the devious path of religious-diplomatic history carefully while passing assessments on institutions and leaders.... The bibliography, but more especially the footnotes, will aid fellow researchers in the field." - Choice

Excerpt

The small band of Catholics who followed Leonard Calvert, the brother of Lord Baltimore, to America in 1634 had grown into an impressive establishment of twenty million by the 1930s. This transformation came from the high birth rate--Catholics, like all of the settlers, followed a course of replenishing and multiplying--and from tremendous infusions of Irish, Germans, Italians, and Poles in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Faced with a Protestant majority possessing a keen sense of its Reformation heritage, American Catholics at first had turned inward. They thought they were defending themselves against Know-Nothing groups, Maria Monk propaganda, and the American Protective Association. Throughout the nineteenth century, the leaders of American Catholicism strove to reconcile the faith with customs of their adopted land. But integration remained illusory. The Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s and the 1928 presidential campaign dispelled any naive assumptions that Catholics were members of the American community. The arrival in the White House of Franklin D. Roosevelt and the advent of the New Deal, however, did make a difference. President Roosevelt had great rapport with the leaders of . . .

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