World Debt and the Human Condition: Structural Adjustment and the Right to Development

World Debt and the Human Condition: Structural Adjustment and the Right to Development

World Debt and the Human Condition: Structural Adjustment and the Right to Development

World Debt and the Human Condition: Structural Adjustment and the Right to Development

Synopsis

Set against the backdrop of deteriorating living conditions for hundreds of millions of people in developing and debtor countries, this volume concentrates on the structural adjustment policies designed to facilitate debt repayment and to stabilize indebted economies and the effects these policies have on the human rights of affected peoples. Conducted by contributors from various disciplines, this analysis provides distinctive insights into the relationship between international economic decisions and human welfare.

Excerpt

The genesis of this book lies in the major presentations given at a conference entitled "Human Rights and the Consequences of World Debt and Structural Adjustment Policies," sponsored by the Center on Rights Development (CORD), a joint project of the Graduate School of International Studies and the College of Law of the University of Denver and the Iliff School of Theology, and held at the University of Denver in spring 1990. This conference initiated a long-term study, "Right to Development and the Social Consequences of Structural Adjustment Policies," that is continuing as a joint exchange project between CORD and African scholars. Related studies are being done by various groups, including the World Bank and several UN agencies. Each of these studies has a different focus and a different format; all share the common goal of improving the living conditions of the world's people.

The conference sparked spirited debate and lively interchange. Much of the dynamism that marked the gathering came from the interaction of participants with diverse backgrounds and very different perspectives on the issues of debt, development, and human rights. Yet in the midst of this diversity was a shared concern for the deterioration of living conditions experienced by hundreds of millions of people in developing and debtor nations.

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