Emerging Powers: Defense and Security in the Third World

Emerging Powers: Defense and Security in the Third World

Emerging Powers: Defense and Security in the Third World

Emerging Powers: Defense and Security in the Third World

Synopsis

"For those interested in a theoretical discussion of rising regional power and the future of the spread of modern weapons, this is an excellent primer." American Journal of Neuroradiology

Excerpt

New tasks are more challenging in the field of U.S. foreign policy than the attempt to promote international security in Third World regions. The United States and other industrialized countries have a high stake in the security and progress of these regions--for example, in continued access to the vital energy resources of the Persian Gulf--and yet political development and economic modernization in the Third World continue to be jeopardized by the pervasiveness of armed conflicts and other instabilities. Although typically rooted in local causes and local rivalries, those conflicts and instabilities frequently injure Western interests and foster the extension of Soviet power and influence. This comes at a time when, increasingly, opportunities for economic growth in both advanced and developing countries depend on the expansion of world trade and the harnessing of mature and novel modern technologies.

Contemporary challenges of Third World problems for U.S. policymakers are more demanding and complicated than has been true in the past. U.S. power and resources in the first postwar decades were unparalleled, and their application to the Third World regional problems that often arose from decolonization was easier than it is today. Setbacks occurred, to be sure, as in Cuba's conversion to a Soviet client state, and considerable dangers and frustrations were attributable to the Arab-Israeli conflicts, the repercussions of the Communist revolution in China, the Korean War, Indo-Pakistani rivalry, and various other difficulties. But those problems seem to pale in comparison to others now facing U.S. policymakers--problems stemming from the breakdown of U.S. internal consensus, growth of Soviet military power, recurring oil crises in the Middle East, regional destabilization resulting from the Iranian revolution and transnational mobilization of Islamic militancy, escalation of international terrorism, ongoing and seemingly irreversible destruction of Lebanon, and continuing Soviet effort to project power and proxies into troubled areas of the region.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.