Global Telecommunications Policies: The Challenge of Change

Global Telecommunications Policies: The Challenge of Change

Global Telecommunications Policies: The Challenge of Change

Global Telecommunications Policies: The Challenge of Change

Synopsis

Regulatory change has come to characterize global telecommunications in the 1990s. In this timely book, contributors of recognized distinction and knowledge provide a range of perspectives and discuss a variety of approaches to telecommunications issues, providing broad coverage of telecommunications regulatory policies. In its analysis of public policies for deregulating telecommunications services, the work emphasizes the business strategy implications entailed by each public policy. The volume argues that globalization and interdependence are forcing governments to adjust their policies; that technology often eclipses voluntary government policies; and that all multinational corporations, through their investment strategies and R&D efforts, are important actors in regulatory policy, as are national and international agencies.

Excerpt

A decade after the divestiture of American Telephone & Telegraph (AT&T), many countries are reexamining the wave of deregulation that swept across the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Although competition for telecommunications services has been driven by dynamic changes in technology and sophistication of user demand, not all countries are convinced of the benefits of privatization and liberalization, and even if they are, their economies may not be able to support a fully privatized system, particularly in the area of universal basic service. The telecommunications revolution has wrought unprecedented and powerful changes that have been compressed in a short time span and had a phenomenal impact on society. The economic effects of this revolution are beginning to emerge in a significant manner. The industry is facing massive upheavals that challenge established institutional and industrial structures of sectors other than telecommunications.

This rapid growth of electronic highways radically altered the concept of regulators emerging as policy makers. Rule making has become problematic in an environment in which innovations spread across political frontiers even before their application is tested in their country of origin. National and international regulatory regimes have been left behind in the race between technology and industry regulation. The transition from monopoly to competition has been ascribed to factors such as the expansion of business communications, user demand for customized networks, tariff distortions caused by monopoly use of cross subsidies, the trend to bypass the public network, and the growth of electronic data interchange.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.