Implicit Memory: New Directions in Cognition, Development, and Neuropsychology

Implicit Memory: New Directions in Cognition, Development, and Neuropsychology

Implicit Memory: New Directions in Cognition, Development, and Neuropsychology

Implicit Memory: New Directions in Cognition, Development, and Neuropsychology

Synopsis

The immense growth of research on implicit and explicit memory is making it difficult to keep up with new methods and findings, to gauge the implications of new discoveries, and to ferret out new directions in research and theory development. The present volume provides a status report of work on implicit and explicit memory in the three areas that have contributed the bulk of what is known about this domain -- cognitive psychology, lifespan developmental psychology, and neuropsychology. Highlighting developments in methods, critical findings, and theoretical positions, this volume outlines promising new research directions. By so doing, it provides the reader with a multi-disciplinary perspective on implicit and explicit memory, and thereby enables a cross- fertilization of ideas and research.

The chapters that make up this volume were written by experts on the topic of implicit and explicit memory. These contributors were asked to write for a broad audience -- for their colleagues from allied disciplines, for new researchers, for advanced undergraduate and graduate students -- to help them gain a comprehensive overview of the mushrooming research on this topic, grasp the most fundamental empirical and theoretical issues, and focus on new research directions.

Excerpt

In the last decade, research on memory for recent events and experiences sprouted a new branch and we now distinguish between two modes of using memory, called implicit and explicit, respectively. Explicit memory is the mode used in those situations in which recent events and experiences need to be recollected in a deliberate, intentional manner, and implicit memory covers situations in which the same events and experiences influence performance in the absence of specific intentions to recollect them. Several core observations on similarities and differences between implicit and explicit memory were reported in the early 1980s and then interest spread in an explosive manner, so that today this topic can fill entire journal issues and hold center stage at major conferences.

The immense growth of research on implicit and explicit memory is making it difficult to keep up with new methods and findings, to gauge the implications of new discoveries, and to ferret out new directions in research and theory development. Keeping up is especially difficult because research is ongoing in parallel in several domains, including mainstream cognitive psychology, lifespan developmental psychology, neuropsychology, personality, and social cognition. Thus, with research all abuzz around us, we are in danger of losing the forest for the trees. The present volume is intended to counteract that danger. Its purpose is to provide a status report of work on implicit and explicit memory in the three areas that have contributed the bulk of what is known about this domain: cognitive psychology, lifespan developmental psychology, and neuropsychology. In each area, the volume highlights developments in methods, critical findings, and theoretical positions, and it outlines promising new research directions. By so doing, we hope to provide the reader with a multidisciplinary perspective on . . .

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