Human Error: Cause, Prediction, and Reduction

Human Error: Cause, Prediction, and Reduction

Human Error: Cause, Prediction, and Reduction

Human Error: Cause, Prediction, and Reduction

Synopsis

This volume examines the nature of human error -- its causes and origins, its classifications, and the extent to which it is possible to predict and prevent errors and their impact. One of the first texts to deal with this topic in detail, it draws into a single cohesive account contributions from experts in a range of disciplines including psychology, philosophy, and engineering. Offering an insightful discussion of fundamental and necessary questions about the nature and source of human error, the book draws significant conclusions and identifies areas worthy of further exploration. This volume will be of interest to all who are concerned with the impact human error has on both the individual and society.

Excerpt

There is a compelling need for innovative approaches to the solution of many pressing problems involving human relationships in today's society. Such approaches are more likely to be successful when they are based on sound research and applications. This Series in Applied Psychology offers publications which emphasize state-of-the-art research and its application to important issues of human behavior in a variety of societal settings. The objective is to bridge both academic and applied interests.

Few would dispute the fact that biographical data predict performance and the importance of the need better to understand the nature of human error. It has been variously estimated that as many as 90 percent of industrial and system failures are triggered by human error. Yet relatively little attention has been paid to error by behavioral scientists. The need for such attention struck John Senders in 1978 as a serious flaw in the programs of research on human performance supported by the Department of Defense. He urged those doing such research to pay attention to error, and he took the advice himself. Neville Moray needed little convincing, and the effort to improve knowledge of human failure has become somewhat of a crusade for both.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.