Greek Political Theory: Plato and His Predecessors

Greek Political Theory: Plato and His Predecessors

Greek Political Theory: Plato and His Predecessors

Greek Political Theory: Plato and His Predecessors

Excerpt

In 1906 a book -- the first book of the writer, with all (and perhaps more than all) the imperfections of a first book -- was published under the title of The Political Thought of Plato and Aristotle. Some time before the outbreak of the war the publisher's stock was exhausted; and the writer, alike under his contract with the publisher, who was anxious for a new edition, and under his feeling of obligation to students of the subject, felt himself bound to take in hand the preparation of a new recension of the work.

It was his original intention simply to correct the errors and prune away the redundancies -- which were many -- of the original edition. But a great deal of work had been done since 1906, which touched the subject he had originally sought to cover: his own ideas had matured; and after a time he came to the conclusion that it was better to rewrite the original work, using fully the new material and his own maturer judgement, and planning the whole on a juster and more proportionate scale. He determined accordingly to write a history of Greek Political Theory in two volumes, of which the first and longer volume should be devoted to Plato and his Predecessors, and the second and shorter to Aristotle and his Successors. The first of these volumes is here printed: the second the writer hopes to finish as soon as the position of national affairs justifies him in undertaking such work. For the present other duties have a prior claim.

The first chapter of the volume is the introduction of the original edition, with some modifications. The second is entirely new. The third, fourth, and fifth chapters correspond, to some extent, to the first chapter of the original work; but there is little left which the reader of the older form will recognize. The sixth and seventh chapters represent a complete revision of the substance of the second chapter of the earlier work. The eighth to the eleventh chapters correspond to the third chapter of the old form; but the eleventh chapter is entirely, and much of the rest very largely, new. The rest of the work, while it corresponds to the fourth chapter of the first edition, is entirely rewritten; and hardly more than a few paragraphs of the older form survive. The ap-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.