The House of Commons at Work

The House of Commons at Work

The House of Commons at Work

The House of Commons at Work

Excerpt

Parliament, like the great Duke, might reasonably complain that it has of late been 'much exposed to authors'. Varying in scope and excellence from the fifteenth edition of Erskine May Parliamentary Practice to the most trifling reminiscences, more books on this great institution have appeared in the last five years than probably the previous twenty years. It may safely be assumed that in these days of scarcity of men and materials so copious a supply must accurately reflect the urgency of the demand. Even without the appearance of these new books on Parliament, the vast increase in the sales of Hansard and the long queues which every day wait patiently in rain and sun outside St Stephen's porch in the hope of admission to the Chamber are evidence enough of the new and intense interest in Parliament and matters parliamentary. It is undoubtedly a healthy interest. No one can deny that it is to the advantage of a democratic state that its members should be anxious to know as much as possible about the workings of their state and its Government. No one can deny that the desire for such knowledge should be as fully satisfied as possible. There is every possible justification for as great an abundance of books on this and related subjects as possible.

I do not, however, offer this work merely as a contribution to this desirable abundance. At the time when it was first projected (1943) there were hardly any books on the . . .

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