From Massacres to Genocide: The Media, Public Policy, and Humanitarian Crises

From Massacres to Genocide: The Media, Public Policy, and Humanitarian Crises

From Massacres to Genocide: The Media, Public Policy, and Humanitarian Crises

From Massacres to Genocide: The Media, Public Policy, and Humanitarian Crises

Synopsis

Human suffering on a large scale is a continuing threat to world peace. Several dozen gruesome civil wars disturb global order and jar our collective conscience each year. The 50 million people displaced by current complex humanitarian emergencies overwhelm the ability of the post-Cold War world to understand and cope with genocide, ethnic cleansing, massacres, and other inhumane acts. Greater public awareness of how much is at stake and how much more costly it is to act later rather than sooner can be a critical element in stemming the proliferation of these tragedies. The media play an increasingly crucial role in publicizing humanitarian crises, and advances in technology have intensified the immediacy of their reports. Because the world is watching as events unfold, policymakers are under great pressure to respond rapidly. Close cooperation between international relief agencies and the media is thus essential to help prevent or contain the humanitarian emergencies that threaten to overwhelm the world's capacity to care and assist. The authors of this book - all prominent in the fields of disaster relief, journalism, government policymaking, and academia - show how influential well-informed and well-developed media attention has become in forming policies to resolve ethnic and religious conflict and humanitarian crises. The authors argue that the media and humanitarians can collaborate effectively to alter both the attitudes of the public and the actions of policymakers regarding ethnic conflict and humanitarian crises.

Excerpt

Large-scale human suffering is a continuing threat to world peace. Each year several dozen gruesome civil wars disturb global order and jar our collective conscience. Recurrent ethnic and religious strife from Angola to Guatemala, unthinkable acts of inhumanity in Bosnia and Rwanda, and violence accompanying the unraveling of the former Soviet Union demonstrate that neighbors killing neighbors is a global reality with potentially ominous implications for the entire international community.

The 50 million people displaced by current complex humanitarian emergencies overwhelm the post-post-Cold War world's ability to understand and to cope with genocide, ethnic cleansing, massacres, and other inhumane acts. the United Nations and regional groups have tried, but they cannot successfully manage the proliferation of tragedies without greater public awareness of how much is at stake, and how much more expensive it is to act later rather than sooner.

The media play an increasingly crucial role in publicizing humanitarian crises, and advances in technology have intensified the immediacy of their reports. Because global communication networks facilitate intensive, ongoing coverage of crises throughout the world as they unfold, policy-makers are under great pressure to respond rapidly to events. Close cooperation between international relief agencies and the media is thus essential to help prevent and contain the complex humanitarian . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.