England and the English from an American Point of View

England and the English from an American Point of View

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England and the English from an American Point of View

England and the English from an American Point of View

Read FREE!

Excerpt

LEAVING New York on a steamer officered and manned by Englishmen your impressions may begin from the moment you put foot on board. The change from the restless volubility of the Irish cab driver to the icy servility of the Englishman of the servant class is soothing, depressing, irritating or amusing as the case may be. The chattering, waving, gesticulating high-voiced travellers, and good- byers, are apparently of no interest to the stolid stewards, who move about at slower speed, speak in lower tones, do what they have to do with as little unnecessary expenditure of nerve, and muscle, and speech power, as possible. Even before the ship moves you have moved from the exhilarating, bracing, bright air of inland and upland plains, to the heavier and more . . .

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