Managing Planet Earth: Perspectives on Population, Ecology, and the Law

Managing Planet Earth: Perspectives on Population, Ecology, and the Law

Managing Planet Earth: Perspectives on Population, Ecology, and the Law

Managing Planet Earth: Perspectives on Population, Ecology, and the Law

Synopsis

This book provides a concrete, easily understood, and realistic analysis of the scientific and legal dimensions of environmental stability. Santos outlines the current international ecological crises and defines them as the most serious threat to international world order and ecological stability. Although written for ecologists, environmental scientists, demographers, political scientists, economists, and lawyers, this book is not limited to them. Anyone interested in the relationship between the environment and society will find this book instructive and provocative.

Excerpt

Human population is presently increasing exponentially. In 1950 there were 2.5 billion people in the world. By 1970, this increased to 3.7 billion, and today there are approximately 5 billion people residing on this planet. If the present growth rate persists, there will be 30 billion people on Earth by the end of the twenty-first century. It is a truism that the human population cannot continue this infinite increased on a finite earth.

Society cannot increase beyond its ability to acquire natural resources or to dispose safely of pollutants. We must remember that interactions with other species and other humans may determine the world carrying capacity. When, how, and what laws or principles are employed by the international legal system to reach an optimum sustainable society is a matter of grave concern.

One need not be an ecologist, environmental scientist, demographer, political scientist, economist, or lawyer to understand the dangers implicit in an uncontrolled degradation of the environment. Achieving a world population restricted to the optimum number of people that the earth can adequately sustain presents problems that are difficult to solve. Calculating how many people each individual nation should have and determining the means by which politically various populations will be controlled calls for difficult decisions. Second only to the risks of international superpower confrontations stemming from interruptions in the supplies . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.