The Winning of the West - Vol. 1

The Winning of the West - Vol. 1

The Winning of the West - Vol. 1

The Winning of the West - Vol. 1

Synopsis

Candy Story recounts a turbulent year in the life of Mia, a young woman whose apparent calm is perpetually threatened by inner doubts and outer catastrophe. Her modest dreams of happiness are dashed by the deaths of her mother, old friends, and her lover. Mia is a talented writer, the author of an autobiographical novel. Now, assailed by calamity and misfortune, she struggles with writer's block, confounded-at least for the moment-by the senseless world around her.Candy Story is the fourth novel by Marie Redonnet. Translations of the first three-H¿tel Splendid, Forever Valley, and Rose Mellie Rose-are also available from the University of Nebraska Press. In its unadorned prose and passionate focus on the inner life of a young woman, this fourth novel is unmistakably allied to the earlier ones. It will enthrall Redonnet's admirers and win new ones.Born in Paris in 1947, Redonnet taught for a number of years in a suburban lyc¿e before deciding to pursue a writing career full time. Since her volume of poetry Le Mort & Cie appeared in 1985, she has published four novels, a novella, numerous short stories, and three dramatic works.Alexandra Quinn is a program associate at The Academy of American Poets in New York. This is her first book-length translation.

Excerpt

John Milton Cooper Jr.

No American president has enjoyed stronger associations with the West than Theodore Roosevelt. of all his physical characteristics, only his teeth and eyeglasses identified him better than his broad-brimmed rancher's hat. His cavalry regiment in the Spanish-American War drew heavily, though not exclusively, on men from the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains, who proudly bore the press-spawned sobriquet of "Rough Riders." Political friends and foes alike dubbed Roosevelt a "cowboy." Nor did these western associations end with experiences and imagery. Roosevelt also wrote several books about the West. One of those books was a brief, hastily done biography of Thomas Hart Benton, while others collected his 1880s magazine articles recounting his exploits as a hunter and rancher. But the West also furnished the subject of the most substantial and scholarly writing that he ever did. Between 1889 and 1897, Roosevelt published four volumes analyzing the expansion of Euro-Americans from the British colonies (and later the United States) from 1763 to 1807. the work was entitled The Winning of the West.

Strong as those personal and literary associations were, however, much remained odd about Theodore Roosevelt as a westerner. No other president has been more of an urbanite than this native of New York City (the only one to gain the White House), where he ran for mayor and served as police commissioner--or more of an "easterner than this blueblooded descendant of Knickerbockers and Mayflower voyagers, this Harvard graduate and member of Porcellian, who had lived and traveled extensively in Europe be-

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