Sports in the Lives of Children and Adolescents: Success on the Field and in Life

Sports in the Lives of Children and Adolescents: Success on the Field and in Life

Sports in the Lives of Children and Adolescents: Success on the Field and in Life

Sports in the Lives of Children and Adolescents: Success on the Field and in Life

Synopsis

An investigation of the role of sports in the process of healthy maturation from childhood through adolescence, this invaluable resource helps parents make informed decisions about their children's involvement in sports. Griffin also explains effective parenting techniques for those whose children are involved in athletics. This book is also highly useful and thought-provoking reading for professionals, including educators, coaches, and counselors.

Excerpt

I remember when I opened Ken Heise's letter. It was a pleasant, sunny morning in late August, over a year ago as I write this. I was in my office at the University of Vermont, where I am on the faculty in education. I was going through a pile of mail that had accumulated over the summer while I had been in Finland doing some lecturing and consulting. The school year would begin in a few days.

In addition to taking care of correspondence that had been stacked neatly on my desk, the day was to be dedicated to getting back into the swing of things at the university, preparing courses I would be teaching in the upcoming semester, checking on committee assignments, and seeing what colleagues on the faculty had been up to. After about five minutes of going through university memoranda, notices of professional meetings, and advertisements for text materials, I found that this undertaking was getting tedious. I decided it might brighten my day if instead of taking mail from off the top of the pile, I would sort down through the stack and find some "real" letters--that is, with envelopes you buy at the drug store, written by hand, and affixed with a stamp you have to lick to get to stick in place.

The first real letter I found had been postmarked in Collierville, Tennessee three weeks earlier. The return address said it was from a Ken Heise--no one I knew. "Wonder what this is about," I thought, as I opened the envelope and read the single hand-written sheet of paper:

Dear Professor Griffin:

My wife and I disagree on whether our children should participate in school athletics. My daughter is 10 and my son is 6. My daughter is interested in basketball and my son likes all sports. Personally, I played basketball and ran . . .

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