The Impact and Improvement of School Testing Programs

The Impact and Improvement of School Testing Programs

The Impact and Improvement of School Testing Programs

The Impact and Improvement of School Testing Programs

Excerpt

At the June, 1959, meeting of the Board of Directors, it was noted that, although the National Society for the Study of Education had published several important yearbooks on the development and use of scales, standardized tests, and other forms of measurement and had published a larger number of yearbooks in which aspects of measurement were treated in the context of a variety of subjects, many years had elapsed since the Society had brought out a volume which focused on the best thought and most useful practices in any broad area of the field of testing.

Beginning with its earlier yearbooks on the subject, e.g., The Measurement of Educational Products (1918) and Intelligence Tests and Their Uses (1922) and extending to its more recent publications, the Society has been fortunate in being able to number among its contributors such leaders in the field as Thorndike, Courtis, Trabue, Starch, Whipple, Terman, Pintner, Thurstone, Gates, and many others of like stature.

It was decided that the Society would seek to have the successors of these men formulate and present the best in current theory and evaluate the impact of testing programs upon the schools. To plan the volume and to advise in assembling the talent needed to prepare it, the Society turned to Warren G. Findley, Assistant Superintendent for Pupil Personnel Services of the Atlanta Schools and more recently, Professor of Education at the University of Georgia.

Mr. Findley and the members of his committee decided, so far as it proved practicable, to present the materials in the form of a series of recommendations with supporting arguments based upon a rigorous evaluation of research and practice.

The committee and its collaborating authors have succeeded in making many issues and problems in testing understandable to teachers and laymen, have made clear that there is no causal relation between the growth in testing during the last decade or more and the increasing acuteness of educational and social problems during the same period, and have produced what Dilworth or . . .

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