Joint Curriculum Design: Facilitating Learner Ownership and Active Participation in Secondary Classrooms

Joint Curriculum Design: Facilitating Learner Ownership and Active Participation in Secondary Classrooms

Joint Curriculum Design: Facilitating Learner Ownership and Active Participation in Secondary Classrooms

Joint Curriculum Design: Facilitating Learner Ownership and Active Participation in Secondary Classrooms

Synopsis

This volume offers a progressive approach to secondary teaching and teacher training, with particular emphasis upon students and teachers collaborating to negotiate curriculum design--goals, content, methods, and assessment. Based upon mutual trust and partnership, openness and flexibility, Joint Curriculum Design engages secondary students and teachers in an ongoing dialogue regarding teaching and learning. Through critical literacy, action research, and critical pedagogy, students and teachers form a community of learners who interrogate issues, problem-solve, and assess individual and group learning.

The author offers a comprehensive understanding of curriculum components and their impact. As a result, her book challenges students and teachers to create environments of learning that embrace all learners, to redefine resources, and to empower learners to develop voice and social agency. In an inductive approach, the book invites active construction of knowledge, innovation, joint debriefing, and reflectivity for more effective teaching and learning.

Excerpt

Maxine Greene

The metaphor is theater -- or, more precisely, the shared activity of moving a play from script to live presentation. Images are evoked of engaged human beings who have come together to bring something new into the world. In this case, of course, they are teachers and students who have come together to shape the materials of knowledge and experience in such a fashion that new meanings will be released of those involved and for those who attend. Even as the process of play production culminates (or ought to culminate) in the transformation of ordinary reality into something new, something that opens perspectives on what might be or what ought to be, so does curriculum design as described in this book break with the taken-forgranted and the banal. By freeing learners to pose questions they may never have posed before, to articulate concerns seldom heeded before, the activities of design may alter the teaching -- learning situation and infuse it with a new vitality.

In the background, of course, are the suggestive chords of what has been called progressive thought. In these times, and in this book, these chords announce the variations now associated with school renewal, constructivist learning, story telling, and newly conceived modes of collaboration. The old dichotomies, the old either/ors, are transcended. The writer makes one recall John Dewey's caution with regard to our tendency to think in terms of extreme opposites. In Experience and Education (1963), Dewey discussed the tension between the view that the mature person was obligated to impose knowledge and rules of conduct on the young and the view that education should be based on the young's personal experience. It . . .

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