Cognition and the Symbolic Processes: Applied and Ecological Perspectives

Cognition and the Symbolic Processes: Applied and Ecological Perspectives

Cognition and the Symbolic Processes: Applied and Ecological Perspectives

Cognition and the Symbolic Processes: Applied and Ecological Perspectives

Synopsis

This volume is a festschrift dedicated to James J. Jenkins, a pioneer in many areas of experimental psychology. It has three major goals: to provide a forum for debate on current theoretical issues in cognitive psychology, to capture the "state of the art" in reviews of research methods and results, and to generate ideas for new research directions and methodologies. Contributors -- including Jenkins' former students and present colleagues -- ponder fundamental questions such as:

• How do people learn to read?

• What happens during the processes of speech perception?

• How do people acquire problem solving skills?

• How do cognitive and motor skills develop and integrate with one another?

Many chapters focus specifically on ecological and applied cognitive psychology. Specific topics covered include visual and speech perception, language, memory, motivation, child development, problem solving, and pedagogy.

Excerpt

The purpose of this preface is to describe the conference from which this volume stemmed, and to acknowledge the support and assistance of the organizations and individuals who made the conference and volume possible.

COGNITION AND THE SYMBOLIC PROCESSES

The first volume in the series "Cognition and the Symbolic Processes" (Weimer & Palermo, 1974) had as its starting point the "current revolution in psycholinguistics and cognitive psychology" (p. xi; see chapters by Brewer, Dulany, Bransford, Franks, Miller, and Weimer). The second volume (Weimer & Palermo , 1982) seems, in retrospect, to reflect the goal of a somewhat more comfortably established science: "the construction of a psychology of the higher mental processes" (Weimer & Palermo, 1982, p. ix). This constructive effort began in the wake of the immediately prior decade, which had witnessed the rejection of older associationistic and behavioristic approaches (and even some of the early information-processing theories). In that wake, Volume 2 seems, among other things, to herald the "arrival" of ecological psychology (see chapters by Fowler, Pattee, Shaw, Profitt, and Pribram).

The present volume perhaps represents a further step in the maturation of cognitive psychology. Views that were once hotly debated, such as the Gibsonian approach, are now thoroughly engaged in both laboratory research and numerous interesting applications. If anything, this volume represents the arrival of "applied cognitive psychology." Certainly, other recent publications and events reflect the trends and influences that are manifested here. For example, a new journal, Ecological Psychology, has begun publication. There is also a new . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.