The Role of Interest in Learning and Development

The Role of Interest in Learning and Development

The Role of Interest in Learning and Development

The Role of Interest in Learning and Development

Synopsis

"From the padded expense accounts of George Washington to the memorable gaffes of Ronald Reagan, here is a rollicking account of the sins, slips, and peccadilloes of our chief executives. Sometimes irreverent, but never irrelevant, it chronicles the human aspects of two hundred years of presidential leadership: the trials and temptations suffered by the Founding Fathers and their successors, and the impact that their personal, medical, and sexual lives had upon the political scandals of each administration. Executive Privilege debunks myths surrounding former presidents while exposing moments of true courage during their darkest hours of power. Perhaps most importantly, our presidents are shown to be prisoners of their office and responsibilities to an extent that is rarely recognized. This is a rollercoaster ride over the bumpy landscape of presidential perks and privileges. The stories of the men and women who rose and fell along the way speak volumes to the Americans of today." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

The impetus for this volume stems from an extended lunch during the 1988 Meetings of the American Educational Research Association in New Orleans. We, the editors and some of the authors of chapters in this book, were discussing the emerging "interest" in interest research and its importance as a critical bridge between cognitive and affective issues in both learning and development. It was clear to us that interest research provided a way to focus the increasing concern of educators and psychologists for studying the individual in context, examining affective variables as opposed to purely structural features of text, analyzing the interrelationship of cognitive and social development, understanding practical applications of theories of motivation, and recog-nizing the importance of developmental psychology for the study of learning. We discussed the need for a forum in which those studying interest might share their work with others, and decided to compile a book about recent theoretical and empirical contributions to this field. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates agreed to publish this book.

It was acknowledged at the outset that each of the contributing authors would offer a unique perspective on understanding interest and its effects on learning and development. Despite a long tradition of interest-related research in both psychology and education, the more recent work in this area could only be described as an emerging phenomenon--no two researchers were really working with exactly the same sets of questions. In fact, as editors we were not in particular agreement with each other about what interest was, although we all agreed that interest was important and that we needed to continue to talk with each other in order to understand . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.