Solutions for the New Work Force: Policies for a New Social Contract

Solutions for the New Work Force: Policies for a New Social Contract

Solutions for the New Work Force: Policies for a New Social Contract

Solutions for the New Work Force: Policies for a New Social Contract

Excerpt

Newspaper headlines, sophisticated research reports, and daily personal experience are all reaching the same conclusion in the 1980s: these are troubling times for Americans who must work for a living.

Who are these Americans? They are people like the clerical worker in Milwaukee who had a heart attack and bypass surgery. She has three part-time jobs but no health insurance--none of her jobs provided benefits.

Like the baker on the night shift at Mr. Donut in Philadelphia, who was fired from his $17,000-a-year job when he took three days off to take his infant Down's syndrome daughter to the hospital for emergency surgery. Now his wife supports him and their two adopted, disabled children on a secretary's salary.

Or like the former automobile worker who moved his family to Los Angeles from Detroit in search of work. Both he and his wife found work but their combined minimum-wage income fails to pay the rent. The family is now one of LA's homeless.

These people are part of a new work force, characterized by marginal working conditions, shaped by the influx of women . . .

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