Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality in the United States: Toward the Twenty-First Century

Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality in the United States: Toward the Twenty-First Century

Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality in the United States: Toward the Twenty-First Century

Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality in the United States: Toward the Twenty-First Century

Synopsis

Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality in the United States: Toward the Twenty-First Century is designed for both the general reader and the growing proliferation of racial/ethnic undergraduate courses. It provides thematic integration and synthesis of knowledge about race and ethnicity from many diverse fields. Taking the racial formation perspective in the study of race, ethnicity, and nationality as its starting point, the book extends this theory in a number of ways. Throughout, the book is concerned with the changing patterns of inter-minority group relations which has tended to be neglected for a focus on white/black relations in scholarly and public discourse.

Excerpt

This book is intended for use in advanced undergraduate and graduate-level courses on race and ethnicity and on diversity in America. It was first conceived as a collective project of the Research and Resident Scholar Program in Comparative Race Relations at Washington State University, which was established in 1994 with support from the Rockefeller Foundation. A number of the participating authors are established scholars in racial/ethnic studies, and several have published award-winning bestsellers. Others are relative newcomers to the field who were invited to join the project because they were doing important work on less well covered topics, such as relations between African Americans and Chicano/Latino Americans.

The volume is multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary: We deliberately selected chapter authors grounded in diverse disciplines (anthropology, ethnic studies, cultural studies, literary studies, sociology, political science, education, psychology, and history) who are receptive to boundary-crossing. The book is thus particularly well suited for use as a text in the growing number of upper-division undergraduate courses in ethnic studies, sociology, American studies, and general education that are aimed at integrating knowledge about race and ethnicity drawn from diverse disciplines.

A number of the book's chapters, while they were yet in manuscript form, were tested as required readings in such courses, with a good deal of success. In my own courses I have supplemented readings from this book with inclass discussions, videos, and additional reading material. I have found that in this context the book provides a good conceptual "bridge" to the twenty- first century, enhancing students' understanding of the historical evolution and the ongoing impact of race and ethnicity in the United States during an era of accelerating social change.

Paul Wong . . .

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