Productivity Measurement and Improvement: Organizational Case Studies

Productivity Measurement and Improvement: Organizational Case Studies

Productivity Measurement and Improvement: Organizational Case Studies

Productivity Measurement and Improvement: Organizational Case Studies

Synopsis

Improving organizational productivity is an important current and future issue. The improvement can be effected by changing technology, or by changing the way in which people work. The concern of this work is how to structure work so that people can and will want to maximize their productivity using a special approach to measurement and improvement of organizational productivity defined by the author - ProMES (Productivity Measurement and Enchancement System). ProMES is a way of motivating people to maximize their productivity. This book describes a series of cases where ProMES was applied to improve productivity in service and manufacturing organizations in a variety of different organizations in different countries. Results indicate very large increases in productivity, much larger than those typically found. Lessons learned from these cases for future productivity improvement efforts are summarized.

Excerpt

Steven D. Jones

One of the staples for increasing productivity has been that of feedback to individuals, work groups, and organizations. It has not, however, been uniformly effective. For example, in a review of objective feedback applications in organizations, Balcazar, Hopkins, and Suarez (1986) found that feedback was ineffective in 15 percent of the studies and that 57 percent of the studies reported mixed results (significant improvements in some but not all of the dependent variables, or an improvement for some but not all subjects). Although other reviewers (e.g., Guzzo, Jette, & Katzell, 1985) have found more consistent improvements with feedback in the workplace, the variability of the results indicates there is still much to learn about applying feedback in organizations.

The purpose of this chapter is to describe the development of ProMES and the results during feedback for two manufacturing work groups. By examining both a successful and an unsuccessful application, issues are raised that may aid our understanding of ProMES not just as a technique but also as an improvement effort.

Method

Parent Organization and Local Facility

The work groups involved in the project (referred to here as group 1 and group 2) were part of a manufacturing facility in the southeastern United States that is, in turn, a part of a Fortune 500 corporation. the corporation holds the largest market share of its principle product relative to competition and is constantly striving to increase quality and . . .

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