International Afro Mass Media: A Reference Guide

International Afro Mass Media: A Reference Guide

International Afro Mass Media: A Reference Guide

International Afro Mass Media: A Reference Guide

Synopsis

This guide represents the first serious academic assessment of the relationships between peoples in Africa and of African descent and "Afro" mass media around the world. Experts on communications in sub-Saharan and North Africa and the Caribbean and African-American media in the United States characterize the settings and philosophical contexts for media in the countries that they survey; the development of often difficult relationships between government, society, and the media; the education and training of media personnel; and the implications of new technologies and future challenges. Designed for students, teachers, and professionals in communications and in the social sciences broadly.

Excerpt

This reference guide examines and assesses the relationships between peoples in Africa and of African descent and "Afro" mass media around the world. It focuses on the media systems of four major audiences: sub-Saharan Africans, North Africans, Caribbeans, and African-Americans. It is not a survey of media facilities in those regions. Rather, the authors provide a four-pronged analysis of the media: their settings and philosophical contexts, their development and government relations, the education and training of their personnel, and the challenges in the use of new technologies.

Much of the human dilemma results from the external differences among people. Race and national origin are two constructs through which people may differentiate themselves. Thus, the word "Afro" in the title of this work is intended to be a global term used to refer to people who trace their ancestors to Africa and people who live in certain countries on the continent.

As one of the first great civilizations of the world, Africa was noted for its powerful kingdoms for nearly 6,500 years. Africa's racial purity changed over the centuries as the continent attracted imperialists nearly 700 years before the birth of Christ. The Assyrians (670 B.C.), the Persians (525 B.C.), the Greeks (332 B.C.), the Romans (30 B.C.), and the Arabs (642 A.D.) each took their turns as conquerors, bringing a variety of cultural influences to northern Africa.

The media audiences in the four geographically distinct regions that are the focus of this guide have had extensive historical and cultural contacts and have been subject to external influences.

For example, long before the earliest Portuguese set foot on Africa and before the onset of the scramble for Africa, Africans had coastal trading posts and trans-Saharan caravan networks through which they became involved in commercial and cultural relations with the rest of the world. Thus, when the . . .

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