Blacks and Jews on the Couch: Psychoanalytic Reflections on Black-Jewish Conflict

Blacks and Jews on the Couch: Psychoanalytic Reflections on Black-Jewish Conflict

Blacks and Jews on the Couch: Psychoanalytic Reflections on Black-Jewish Conflict

Blacks and Jews on the Couch: Psychoanalytic Reflections on Black-Jewish Conflict

Synopsis

The Black-Jewish conflict is constantly taking on new dimensions, and without effective strategies for intervention, a dismal state of relations between the two groups can only be expected to worsen. This contributed volume suggests a psychoanalytic approach to conceptualizing and resolving the complex emotional issues causing the conflict.

Excerpt

Alan Helmreich and Paul Marcus

Recently there has been a steady stream of publications lamenting the state of black-Jewish relations. Paul Berman anthology, Blacks and Jews: Alliances and Arguments (1994); Murray Friedman What Went Wrong? the Creation and Collapse of the Black-Jewish Alliance (1995); Michael Lerner and Cornel West Jews and Blacks: Let the Healing Begin (1995); Jack Salzman and Cornel West anthology, Struggles in the Promised Land: Toward a History of Black-Jewish Relations in the United States (1997); and most recently, Seth Forman Blacks in the Jewish Mind: a Crisis in Liberalism (1998) -- all testify to the fact that members of each community are deeply troubled by the deterioration in black-Jewish relations. Moreover, in a certain sense, the black-Jewish conflict is a subspecies of the larger racial problem in this country between people of color and whites. Our hope is that this volume will not only provide some new insights into black-Jewish conflict and its amelioration, but it will also serve as a useful point of entry into gaining greater understanding of the larger racial conflict in which it resides.

As Freud noted, most intimate and meaningful relationships between individuals have their fair share of ambivalence. the same can be said about intergroup relations between minorities with a long-standing history of involvement with each other. the black-Jewish relationship, as we have noted, is certainly no exception. Friedman for example, documents the mistaken but widely held notion that blacks and Jews throughout American history came together in a common fight against prejudice and racism until the alliance began to fall apart in the mid-1960s. Rather, says Friedman . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.