Equilibration, Mind, and Brain: Toward an Integrated Psychology

Equilibration, Mind, and Brain: Toward an Integrated Psychology

Equilibration, Mind, and Brain: Toward an Integrated Psychology

Equilibration, Mind, and Brain: Toward an Integrated Psychology

Synopsis

A multidisciplinary progression of Piaget's equilibration, this major work depicts mind/brain as a regulator of equilibratory processes. Parkins describes mind/brain in terms of information representation and processing requirements for learning-based control. He considers a number of psychological processes in terms of his model and also interprets a number of disorders (schizophrenia, depression, epilepsy, and Parkinsonian disorders). Parkins takes a significant step toward an integrated psychology systematically integrating observations and theories from a broad range of psychological disciplines in terms of one principle--equilibration.

Excerpt

In 1976, while on a post-graduate course at Oxford University, I had a brief encounter with some of the ideas of Piaget. His general ideas on cognitive development seemed to suggest a relationship with neurological development, especially in view of the importance he placed on equilibration. Furthermore, as I had a background in engineering and a knowledge of control processes, I considered that equilibration applied meaningfully to cognition should be described in part in terms of information processing.

This volume is the result of my attempt to address these two points. In the pursuit of a logical and meaningful description, the work soon grew in complexity as it led more widely into various mind/brain-related disciplines and more deeply within each discipline. I hope that in the effort to develop an integrated multidisciplinary description that would be both meaningful and intellgible at a multidisciplinary level, there has not been a detrimental sacrifice of depth. Hopefully, the result is a step toward an integrated psychology.

I would like to express my thanks to those who have helped me in various ways: colleagues for proofreading; Mr. P. Pumphrey and Mr. R. Holden for comments on parts of the work; Mrs. M. Turner for Russian translation; and my parents for being just that. I would like to express thanks to my wife for French translation and typing, and my deepest gratitude for her share in the material sacrifice, for her temporal sacrifice, and, uniquely, for her belief.

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