Motivation, Emotions, and Leadership: The Silent Side of Management

Motivation, Emotions, and Leadership: The Silent Side of Management

Motivation, Emotions, and Leadership: The Silent Side of Management

Motivation, Emotions, and Leadership: The Silent Side of Management

Synopsis

Leadership is motivation and motivation is leadership, say the authors of this important and unique study. The two elements are inseparable, but until now no one has actually conceptualized motivation in a useful way to demonstrate and analyze the connection between it and leadership. The key for leaders is dealing with the emotions that underlie and activate motivation. Maddock and Fulton provide a highly successful, proven, and replicable approach not only to motivate people, but also to train them to lead others. The authors develop an 11 level structure of human motivation that defines and describes motivation in simple, graphic, all-inclusive language. They then show how leaders can use this motivational hierarchy to solve complex problems in the workplace.

Excerpt

Much of what has been learned about leadership in the 1980s and '90s has had to be shelved.

Some religious leaders who were able to command and control large empires and collect untold millions in contributions via televised services turned out to be devoid of character. Similarly, as was seen in the presidential elections that brought Bill Clinton into office, character is really not a very important issue when it comes to choosing a leader. This observation was seconded by voters in Illinois who chose Dan Rostenkowski and Mel Reynolds, by stockholders of the Bendix Corporation who chose William Agee as CEO, and by the numerous people who felt that O. J. Simpson was a paragon of virtue because of his professional stature in sports and on television. Character appears to be neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition of leadership. Surprising, isn't it?

It was also determined that leadership was not gender related. In the 1980s and '90s, women replaced men in positions of leadership in record numbers, and the contribution made by women to organizations and groups, in management and in overall direction, was very impressive.

It was learned that leadership and the selection or identification of leaders was not within the exclusive purview or scope of any one group, such as managers, psychologists, educators or politicians. Although some in these groups may claim authenticity or authority . . .

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