American Women Managers and Administrators: A Selective Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Leaders in Business, Education, and Government

American Women Managers and Administrators: A Selective Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Leaders in Business, Education, and Government

American Women Managers and Administrators: A Selective Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Leaders in Business, Education, and Government

American Women Managers and Administrators: A Selective Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Leaders in Business, Education, and Government

Synopsis

"While biographical information on many of the women is readily available in other sources, this is a handy compilation, especially for identifying material on contemporary women administrators. It would be appropriate in larger public libraries and academic libraries, especially those that focus on women's studies." Library Journal

Excerpt

Abzug, Bella Savitsky (July 24, 1920-). First Jewish woman in Congress.

Bella Savitsky (later Abzug) was born in the Bronx (July 24, 1920), to Emmanuel and Esther Savitsky. Her father, who had emigrated from Russia, died when Abzug was in her teens. Abzug attended public school in the Bronx, graduating from Walton High School.

Attending Hunter College because no tuition was required, Abzug was elected president of the student council. in these years she became a Zionist. After graduation from Hunter in 1942, she enrolled in Columbia Law School, attending on a scholarship. An editor of the Columbia Law Review, Abzug received her ll.B. degree in 1947, graduating at the top of her class.

For several years she specialized in labor law and civil rights cases, serving as a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union and the Civil Rights Congress. During the 1950s and 1960s she assisted with legislation that evolved into the Civil Rights Act of 1954 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Joining the antiwar activists in the 1960s, she helped found the Women Strike for Peace. Abzug participated in the "Dump Johnson" movement of 1967 and 1968; as a supporter of Eugene McCarthy's presidential campaign, she served as president of the Democratic Alternative and as a founder of the New Democratic Coalition.

In March 1970 Abzug announced her candidacy for Congress from the nineteenth Congressional District, which included the Lower East Side, Chinatown, Little Italy, Greenwich Village and part of the Upper West Side. Challenging fourteen-year Democratic incumbent Leonard Farbstein, her campaign slogan was "This woman belongs in the House." Abzug easily won the primary in June and with the support of Mayor Lindsay, peace groups and women's rights groups, defeated Republican candidate Barry Farber in the election in November.

Known as "Battling Bella," "Hurricane Bella," and "Mother Courage," Abzug lost no time attacking the issues. Her first day in Congress she introduced a resolution that called for the withdrawal of all troops from Southeast Asia by July 4, 1971. After her resolution failed, she called for the abolition of the draft and participated in unofficial public hearings on war crimes in Vietnam.

During the 92nd Congress, Abzug spoke on behalf of the Equal Rights Amendment and later was active in penning the law which provided funding for the National Women's Conference in Houston in 1977. Named by President Carter . . .

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