Federalism and the Environment: Environmental Policymaking in Australia, Canada, and the United States

Federalism and the Environment: Environmental Policymaking in Australia, Canada, and the United States

Federalism and the Environment: Environmental Policymaking in Australia, Canada, and the United States

Federalism and the Environment: Environmental Policymaking in Australia, Canada, and the United States

Synopsis

This edited volume is a comprehensive examination of the legal framework in which environmental policy is fashioned in the major English-speaking federations--the United States, Canada, and Australia. The need for national solutions to environmental problems emerged long after the largest share of governmental power was allotted to states or provinces. This volume attempts to solve the paradox of how a country can have effective laws protecting the environment, vigorously enforced, when legislative and administrative powers are divided between two tiers of government.

Excerpt

The subject of this book is the making and administering of environmental policy in federal states. Experience indicates that countries with federal constitutions face special challenges in fashioning effective laws and regulations to protect the environment. A careful examination of these problems is especially timely given the resurgence of federalism in Russia, Italy, India, and Latin America. A revitalized federalism in Mexico, for instance, is complicating compliance with the environmental side agreement attached to the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and the United States. In the next century, the European Union may become a European Federation. As more and more large or diverse countries adopt democratic and free-market reforms in the post-Cold War era, devolution of power to the regions becomes an increasingly attractive option. At the same time, democratizing nations face rising pressure to take stronger measures to cleanse and safeguard the air, water, and land. As income grows in the developing world, citizens will increasingly demand non-tangible goods from their governments, such as political participation and aesthetically pleasing surroundings. The dilemma then faced is how to formulate and implement effectual policies when power is divided between two tiers of government.

This volume both analyzes the problems unique to federal systems and compares solutions devised by three of the world's most important federations. It arose out of a conference on Environmental Policymaking in Federal States sponsored by the Federalism Research Centre of the Australian National University, held in Canberra, Australia, May 12-14, 1993.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.