Sino-Latin American Economic Relations

Sino-Latin American Economic Relations

Sino-Latin American Economic Relations

Sino-Latin American Economic Relations

Synopsis

Using newly released data from the Chinese government along with extensive interviews in China and Latin America, Li gives us the first systematic analysis of the economic and political ideas underlying the recent surge in Sino-Latin American relations. His focus on China's relations with six major trading partners--Brazil, Argentina, Cuba, Chile, Mexico, and Peru--provides an accurate assessment of trends and prospects for an emerging bilateral economic partnership. The conclusions of this study find that Sino-Latin American ties have become less ideological and present PRC involvement has been largely compatible with Western interests.

Excerpt

As can be seen from the preceding chapters, politics has been a powerful agent in the growth and change of Sino-Latin American relations. in the future, however, underlying economic factors will exert greater influence on the Sino-Latin American connection. This has already become a clear trend. China's relations with most countries in the region are already normalized, and its international relations are increasingly conducted pragmatically. the emerging Sino-Latin American economic relationship will therefore depend more on the structural characteristics of the Chinese and Latin American economies. China's position today is favorable as far as Latin America is concerned. Relations created by past and more recent Chinese immigrants as well as by recent economic ties constitute an excellent basis for close cooperation. China has maintained friendly relations with the Latin American countries, and no tense situation is anticipated. in addition, Chinese positions in international politics lead to no conflicts of interests with Latin America. Notwithstanding its increasing level of involvement in Latin America, and its growing importance in the global strategic balance and world economy, China will remain a regional Asian power; its influence in Latin America will be limited over the next few decades. the most likely scenario is that if China persists in its open-door and reform policy and succeeds, it will become an important trading partner for Latin America within the next two or three decades.

In spite of restraints mentioned in Chapter 8, there is apparently great potential for closer economic ties between China and Latin America. the first section of this chapter compares the salient macroeconomic characteristics of China and Latin America. the second one explores the . . .

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