Their World, Our World: Reflections on Childhood

Their World, Our World: Reflections on Childhood

Their World, Our World: Reflections on Childhood

Their World, Our World: Reflections on Childhood

Synopsis

Yamamoto presents a perspective on the world of children as seen and felt from the inside, based on his own research and that of others. The discussion includes what upsets and disturbs children, how they may handle stressful experiences, what is needed to lay a secure foundation for a healthy development, how children look at themselves, and what characterizes children's worlds. This work offers abundant information on the development of children and encourages parents, other caregivers, teachers, and counselors to reach a better understanding of the unique world of children, to feel more secure in their respective roles, and to use their best learned judgment in relating to individual children.

Excerpt

In 1929, Alfred North Whitehead wrote in The Aims of Education and Other Essays, "Culture is activity of thought and receptiveness to beauty and humane feeling. Scraps of information have nothing to do with it. a merely well-informed man is the most useless bore on God's earth" (1967, p. 1). He therefore suggested that, "in training a child to activity of thought, above all things we must beware of what I will call 'inert ideas'--that is to say, ideas that are merely received into the mind without being utilised, or tested, or thrown into fresh combinations."

This book represents my modest attempt at casting some of the received information into somewhat new combinations so as to make better sense, for myself, of the experience of human development. the particular way I have tried to compare, contrast, and connect scraps of information and to integrate them into an understandable whole may or may not mean much to anybody else. Nevertheless, I am sharing my scheme in the hope that others concerned about children will join in the process, if not in the product, of such personal efforts. As Bruno Bettelheim noted in A Good Enough Parent (1978) some sixty years after Whitehead, parents need to do their own thinking so as to figure out-- largely by and for themselves--a reasonable course of action in raising their children in the particular life contexts best known to them: "Their struggles to do so will make them good enough parents, to . . .

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