Encyclopedia of Ethnicity and Sports in the United States

Encyclopedia of Ethnicity and Sports in the United States

Encyclopedia of Ethnicity and Sports in the United States

Encyclopedia of Ethnicity and Sports in the United States

Synopsis

A comprehensive reference work on the development of athletics in the United States; this encyclopedia examines the sporting experience of Native Americans, African Americans and the immigrant groups of the United States from Colonial times to the present. It includes entries on racial and ethnic groups, ethnic sports, mainstream sports, ethnic and racial institutions and famous sports figures.

Excerpt

The subject of this historical encyclopedia of ethnicity and sports in the United States is the sporting experience of Native Americans, African Americans, and a wide variety of immigrant groups in the United States from the age of colonization to the present. The growing interest in the history of race and ethnicity and the proliferation of sports studies suggest the need for a project of this kind. Although no one-volume reference work can cover every possible aspect of such a vast topic, the editors have striven to make this book as comprehensive as possible.

With the exception of the original inhabitants of North America -- the Native American Indians -- all the peoples of the United States are either immigrants or the descendants of earlier migrants to what early explorers labeled the "New World." In some sense a history of ethnic sports in the United States could be defined as synonymous with a history of sports in general in this country. But for the purposes of this project, the editors have distinguished between a "mainstream" American sporting culture that was established and developed by the earliest newcomers to the British colonies and their descendants (primarily English, but also including smaller numbers of Dutch, German, Scotch Irish, French, and other Europeans), and the sporting traditions and practices of other groups that arrived later or were treated as outsiders (especially African slaves and Native American Indians). Social historians and sociologists generally label the dominant culture as "Anglo" or "WASP" (white, Anglo-Saxon Protestant) or "American," and those terms will be used interchangeably in the entries that follow. Of course, it is also true that mainstream American culture has been dynamic and constantly changing over time, and it has frequently incorporated elements from the sporting traditions of Native American Indians, African Americans, and immigrants. The following introduction briefly refers to this process and also presents three sociological models of assimilation that are useful in understanding ethnic sports in the United States.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.