The Jews in Germany, 1945-1993: The Building of a Minority

The Jews in Germany, 1945-1993: The Building of a Minority

The Jews in Germany, 1945-1993: The Building of a Minority

The Jews in Germany, 1945-1993: The Building of a Minority

Synopsis

Most Jews who now live in Germany have lived elsewhere. They are neither the remnant of those who survived the Holocaust nor those who are in transit to Israel or the United States. They are a disparate but vibrant and growing community of over 80,000 people. Forty thousand of them are members of official Jewish communities in today's Germany. Because of the Nazi past, this proportionately small number of individuals plays an out-of-scale role in German politics and world consciousness. As a study in the formation of minority communities within European national matrices, Cohn's work has interest for sociologists, political scientists, and anthropologists as well. It is the only published work on the Jewish community in Germany today.

Excerpt

Germany today is not Judenfrei, free of Jews. Approximately 80,000 Jews now live within the borders of the German state. Some are religious Jews, some are not. Some are Jews by the rules of ritual law, some are not. All the Jews in Germany, originally from many countries and believing in many different forms of Judaism, have joined together to create a new minority community that has been given the official title of "Jews in Germany."

This book is an attempt to show how the Jews in Germany have built a social structure that acknowledges the influence of the Holocaust, state Communism and theoretical Socialism, and the establishment of the State of Israel. They have created a new community in Germany built on the ruins of the old.

This process of creating the social structure of a minority should be of interest to more than Jews. Political experts, social historians, and anthropologists must study such developments as the latter half of the twentieth century continues to set ethnic groups adrift from their old homelands. the Muslims of Bosnia, the Hmong of Viet nam . . .

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