Transforming Mind: A Critical Cognitive Activity

Transforming Mind: A Critical Cognitive Activity

Transforming Mind: A Critical Cognitive Activity

Transforming Mind: A Critical Cognitive Activity

Synopsis

Emergent paradigms in the physical sciences are combined with deconstructionist methods and Vygotsky's theory of speech and thought to formulate new mind-sets for society and education, which will promote nonlinear, nonpatriarchal, nonviolent, anti-authoritarian worldviews on which to build stronger individuals and societies. E. D. Hirsch and other establishment education "reformers" are shown to be dangerously noncritical and bound to old paradigms that advocate simple solutions to complex problems. Gannaway contends that the nature of contemporary American society is unique and must be creatively analyzed before the educational system can be effectively reformed. She shows teachers how to use familiar texts from popular culture to develop habits of critical thinking that will protect students and citizens from insidious mass media myths.

Excerpt

Gloria Gannaway Transforming Mind:
A Critical Cognitive Activity
brings to focus the debate over cultural literacy, a debate that recycles old assumptions and values regarding the meaning and usefulness of literacy. As Gannaway points out, cultural legionnaires such as E. D. Hirsch support the notion that cultural literacy is a matter of banking the values of our "common culture." This position, unfortunately, still informs the vast majority of educational programs and manifests its logic in the renewed emphasis on the romanticized "good old days" of our Western heritage.

For the notion of cultural literacy to become useful, it must be situated within a theory of cultural production and viewed as an integral part of the way in which people produce, transform, and reproduce meaning. Cultural literacy must be seen as a medium that constitutes and affirms the historical and existential moments of lived experience that produce a subordinate or lived culture. Hence, it is an eminently political phenomenon, and must be analyzed within the context of a theory of power relations and an understanding of social and cultural reproduction and production.

Gannaway's book challenges and deconstructs the process by . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.