Talking about Therapy

Talking about Therapy

Talking about Therapy

Talking about Therapy

Synopsis

Filled with enlightening first-person accounts, Talking About Therapy tells us why patients sought therapy, what they think of the therapists to whom they entrusted their well-being, and whether the treatment was worth the struggle, the emotional pain, and the money. Through stories that are touching, sometimes shocking, and always candid, readers will learn how patients responded to a wide range of treatment, including Freudian and neo-Freudian psychoanalysis, Jungian analytic psychology, group psychotherapy, Reichian therapy, and newer "alternative" approaches. Whether portraying their therapeutic experience as "a scam" or "a liberation, " or something in-between, the feelings shared by these forthright individuals will be fascinating to patients, potential patients, their families, and mental health professionals.

Excerpt

Talking About Therapy provides a wonderful opportunity for individuals who have been in psychotherapy at some period in their lives to describe what it did and did not do for them, and how it helped or failed to help them. It also allows readers who have never undergone therapy as well as those who have been in treatment to experience the process vicariously or to compare their therapy experiences with those described in this book.

All told, the work contains fifty-two narratives covering a range of six decades from the 1940s through the 1990s. At the beginning of each chapter, the authors set the scene by briefly describing the significant social trends and characteristics of the decade. the major forms of therapy and noted theoreticians and practitioners are identified as the work proceeds along with the debates surrounding the efficacy and cost, among other things, of different treatment forms. Thus for each decade, the reader receives an account of the intellectual ferment that prevailed in the mental health world, the leading figures involved, and the often bitter controversies about which approach was best. For example, was it five-days-a-week for five or more years on the couch in the classical Freudian analytical mode, or one-day-a-week for a couple of years sitting up and talking face to face?

As described in the Introduction, the authors culled these fifty-two respondents from more than 300 men and women who were willing to participate, but in no way do they suggest that they have a representative sample of individuals in treatment during each decade. They collected . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.