Eighteenth-Century Women and the Arts

Eighteenth-Century Women and the Arts

Eighteenth-Century Women and the Arts

Eighteenth-Century Women and the Arts

Synopsis

A major task confronting today's scholars is the reclamation from near oblivion of a multitude of works of art, literature, music, scholarship, and other creative enterprises by eighteenth-century women. This fascinating collection provides a multifaceted approach to understanding the roles played by women as both creators of and subjects within works of art in the eighteenth century.

Excerpt

The presence of women in the eighteenth century, and especially in the arts of the time, is at last beginning to be fully appreciated. Hofstra University's Conference on Eighteenth-Century Women and the Arts, held October 10-12, 1985, was one sign of that refreshing change, and will remain so, we trust, in the memories of the many participants and through the selection of papers from the Conference that fill this volume.

The scholarly tasks required for adequate understanding of the topic are many and large, and are variously represented in the chapters and headings under which they are collected here. Part I, "Enlightenment," especially examines the biographical and historical conditions -- sometimes distinctly enlightened, sometimes distinctly not -- in which women of the time lived and worked. Dena Goodman measures the stress between the public and private identities of Julie de Lespinasse. Beth Kowaleski-Wallace describes the sustaining friendship between Elizabeth Carter and Catherine Talbot. Lance E. Wilcox, Jack Undank, and Ellen Messer-Davidow bring to light the attitudes toward women -- especially what should and should not be expected of them and encouraged -- expressed by male authors: respectively, Gibbon, Beaumarchais, and various writers on social and aesthetic propriety. K.J.H. Berland, attending to Frances Brooke, and Ruth Plaut Weinreb, contrasting Madame d'Epinay's idea of education with Rousseau's, describe two women's notable written challenges to prevailing conditions. And Joyce E. East, sketching the career of a now little-known woman playwright, Hannah Cowley, helps recover an example of effective public artistic activity.

The three central parts of the volume focus on women's contributions to . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.