Philippine Higher Education: Toward the Twenty-First Century

Philippine Higher Education: Toward the Twenty-First Century

Philippine Higher Education: Toward the Twenty-First Century

Philippine Higher Education: Toward the Twenty-First Century

Synopsis

This unique volume focuses on the struggle of Philippine educators to develop excellence in higher education. He analyzes educational policy issues both under consideration and in implementation. Swinerton examines the expansion of access; national and regional development; quality undergraduate and graduate education; faculty development; budgetary resources; educational leadership; and institutional and system policy planning and coordination. This study provides a useful knowledge base for use with other emerging nations facing rapid social and economic growth.

Excerpt

Philippine higher education has a historical tradition of serving students' needs and meeting the demands of a developing country. Public and private colleges and universities in the 1990s are enrolling record numbers of students in spite of limited resources, and these students are contributing to a modernizing economy. In 1990, over 1.5 million enrolled in higher education in a population estimated to be over 60,500,000. Yet many Philippine educational and political leaders believe that in this final decade of the twentieth century the nation faces a crisis in education. In their view, Philippine higher education is failing and is seriously deficient.

Senator Edgardo Angara, chair of the Senate Education Committee and former president of the University of the Philippines, notes:

The Philippines up to the late sixties distinguished itself with an advanced educational system. In Southeast Asia the country enjoyed, and still enjoys, one of the highest literacy rates in the region. Our top universities attracted scholars from neighboring countries for study and research. All that however seems to have changed, with the Philippines trailing behind many of its progressive Asian neighbors today. (1988:18)

Senator Angara is quick to observe that "the pessimistic picture, despite the odds, appears to be slowly changing for the better" (1988:18). He points out that the new democratic government is actively attempting to correct the situation:

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