Global Meltdown: Immigration, Multiculturalism, and National Breakdown in the New World Disorder

Global Meltdown: Immigration, Multiculturalism, and National Breakdown in the New World Disorder

Global Meltdown: Immigration, Multiculturalism, and National Breakdown in the New World Disorder

Global Meltdown: Immigration, Multiculturalism, and National Breakdown in the New World Disorder

Synopsis

The modern world is, in the authors' view, undergoing the process of meltdown--global meltdown. Having argued in an earlier book that humankind is headed for an environmental catastrophe that will either eliminate the human species or greatly reduce our numbers, the authors now focus on the breakdown of organized social order that will occur when the ecological crisis happens. Believing that civilization as we know it will not last, even without a definitive environmental cataclysm, they explore here the social, political, and philosophical ramifications of this vision.

Excerpt

Now, as never before, the prospects for a human future are exceptionally dismal. Most probably, the human race will soon and swiftly, but certainly not painlessly, be committed to suicide through use of extant nuclear weaponry. Even if this does not happen, every human being remains in peril of a slow death through poisoning and desiccating the environment in which he lives and by which he is sustained. Even if, just in time, humans should somehow impose a check on their blind and unbelievably stupid conduct, they still remain threatened by a progressive decline of all those attributes and attainments that constitute their humanity. (Lorenz, 1989,3)

This book, although self-contained, develops the argument advanced in our book Healing a Wounded World:
Economics, Ecology and Health for a Sustainable Life
(Smith et al., 1997). That book was concerned with the environmental crisis and the sustainability of human civilization in the light of a number of biophysical limits to growth. We argued in support of the thesis that human demands on the global ecosystem have already reached a point of critical overload and that humanity has already overshot the carrying capacity of the planet. Hence we are living on ecological credit, stolen from future generations ("future-eating"). The entire human race is therefore living on borrowed time and the ecological horsemen of the apocalypse will soon catch up with us. This argument was defended in some detail against the cornucopians and technological optimists who believe that technology, like a deus ex machina, will save us in the nick of time. We argued that technology alone cannot be the answer to human hubris and cannot in itself prevent an environmental nemesis or downfall. Furthermore, the types of economic, social, and lifestyle changes required to avert ecological disaster are too difficult to implement in the time frame of decades, which is essentially all the time humanity has. Therefore we concluded our previous book, asserting that our ecologically wounded world is likely to be "healed," if at all, only by an environmental catastrophe or series of catastrophes that eliminates the human species in toto or reduces our numbers substantially.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.