The Bargaining Manager: Enhancing Organizational Results through Effective Negotiation

The Bargaining Manager: Enhancing Organizational Results through Effective Negotiation

The Bargaining Manager: Enhancing Organizational Results through Effective Negotiation

The Bargaining Manager: Enhancing Organizational Results through Effective Negotiation

Synopsis

Ramundo demonstrates that bargaining is the logical substitute for bossing and the reality of the expanded negotiating role of the manager. He establishes that negotiation is a technical managerial skill which can fill the void created by the absence of meaningful management process. To resolve the dilemma that bargaining is inherently neutral and can be abused, he shows how advocacy and other pursuit of personal interest can be controlled by the organization. He concludes by proposing that his effective-negotiation system, shown to be easily assimilated and most compatible with the management process, be institutionalized as an integral part of that process. Ramundo's approach is refreshingly basic in identifying commitment to the organization and effective managerial process as the keys to more effective management.

Excerpt

The bargaining reality of the managerial process in large organizations, private and governmental, easily led me to conclude in my negotiating guide that the effective-negotiation system or approach could be a useful tool of management. It is clear that the manager who applies negotiation concepts and techniques in the performance of his managerial tasks enjoys a competitive, career-enhancing advantage over his colleagues. This advantage confirms the utility of the negotiation tool from the manager's point of view. The view from the organization, however, is that use of negotiation to pursue personal interest is a disruptive monkey wrench.

The existence of two points of view concerning organizational bargaining reflects an ambiguity that also applies to the concept of management. There is a confusing tendency in the literature to use management as a general term without distinguishing between the acts and interests of the manager and those of his organization. The root of the problem is the almost complete lack of attention to the impact of managerial careerism and parochialism on the pursuit of organizational interests. The implication or assumption is that managers at all levels are dedicated to the pursuit of those interests. The literature does not attempt to deal with the tension that actually exists between personal and organizational interests. Only recently, in connection with corporate restructuring to improve competitiveness, has attention focused on this core problem of management. For example, Chrysler attributes its current capability to expedite car development to eliminating turf issues between departments that were used to protect parochial interests at the expense of the organizational interest. Territorial tugs-of-war are no longer "in" at Chrysler.

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